Chinese Remedial Massage

Chinese remedial massage, also known as Chinese massage therapy (tui na) involves applying various manipulations to stimulate the soft tissues, stretch the muscles and mobilize the joints. When massage is used on specific body regions, the stress acting locally can promote blood circulation and remove stagnation, restore impaired soft tissues and correct bone and joint deformities.

In addition, despite being applied to the surface of the body, massage creates signals that affect the transmission of fluids, qi (vital energy) and blood, which helps to regulate the functional state of the internal organs. Chinese massage therapy is considered to have multiple therapeutic mechanisms such as regulate nervous system, improve blood and lymph circulation, promote bio-active ingredient release, speed up tissue healing, increase metabolism and enhance mobility and flexibility, etc.

In China, massage is not simply regarded as a mean of relaxation but as an important component of traditional Chinese medicine. Its origins date back much earlier than many other therapeutic techniques. Prior to the Qin and Han dynasties (221 BC - AD220), massage had already been widely used as a treatment, and the first specialized work on the subject appeared during this period. Since then, it has undegone long and tortuous historical development and because of its simplicity and safety in application, as well as its effective results, it has evolved into its present popular form
Chinese massage therapy has gone through many ups and downs during its thounsands of years of development. Due to the influences from different academic sources, regional cultures and practical experiences, many different schools and branches were established. They all contributed hundreds of bodywork techniques for clinical application. These schools are mainly distinguished by their particular context and objectives, as the theory and basic techniques are rather similar. Some of the most influential schools are bone-setting massage, acupressure massage, pediatric massage, treading massage, foot massage, slapping massage, sports massage, health massage, etc..

Featured Listings

  • Kevin Chang 185A Burwood Road, Burwood, New South Wales
    Phone: 02 97478818

    Kevin has been practicing Chinese herbal medicine, acupuncture and remedial massage for more than 20 years in both China and Australia. He has also lectured Chinese medicine at University of Sydney, University of Western Sydney » More Info